Just ruminating a bit.

As I starred at my blog and wondered what would be coming next in my life, I supposed that I might as well post something.  So why not a very badly drawn copy of a Bill Mauldin cartoon that I did when I was 15.  I was greatly influenced by Mauldin’s work, but would not even begin to be able to touch his eloquence for many, many more years.

Mine is obviously the one on the right.

Recently I returned to that great cartoon once again.  This time to lampoon my Brother and Sister-in-law who encountered a rat in their cupboard.

Okay, better, but I'm still no Mauldin.

 

 

 

Production Design.

Although I have worked quite extensively in preproduction design and development while in animation, I still look for exposure and opportunity to do so in the live action realm.  I worked for world-class studios such as the Don Bluth Studios, and Walt Disney Feature Animation.  I have experience in contributing to such films as Mulan, Fantasia Continued, Lilo and Stitch, and Brother Bear in the roll of visual development.  Visual Development was the term used to describe to the  artistic effort to design and develop the “look” of the film in preproduction.

A vis-dev piece for "Brother Bear".

I can’t remember if this scene, or anything much like it appears in the film.

A moment from "Mulan".

While this setting never appeared in the film, the pose of Mulan stayed true through development and appeared in the final film.  She winds up sitting like this in the lap of a stone dragon.

The emperor's throne, "Mulan".

Recently I was given a very limited opportunity to do some costume design.  I was promised more work than this one costume, but that never worked out.  The film project was a KOAN production directed by Ryan Little, called Age of the Dragons, starring Danny Glover.

The costume concept rendering for Ahab.

Film still of the actual costume of Ahab, played by Danny Glover.

film shot, Age of the Dragons.

Costumes of other crew that are of similar design.

Well, I of course did not receive any screen credit for just one rendering, and the final costumes did not resemble what I conceived very much.  Hopefully next time will be better.

Sometimes the role of the concept designer is just to breath life into the project that otherwise would just be shelved away (like temporary life-support).  In one case, the work I did helped to bring about a whole new industry for the Walt Disney Company.  Back in 2004 Bob Zalk, a veteran show producer for Disney Imagineering, asked me to do a series of concept illustrations to help pitch an idea of a Disney travel scheme.  The idea succeeded and now includes tours to over 22 destinations world-wide.  It’s called Adventures by Disney.

Concept art of a vacation to the Tetons/Yellowstone area.

Promo photo as it appears today on the Adventures by DIsney web site.